Heartbroken parents of two girls burned to death by Bronx radiator briefly return to apartment

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The parents of the baby girls scalded to death by radiator steam made a grim pilgrimage Friday returning to their Bronx apartment for the first time since the tragedy.

Danielle McGuire Ambrose and her husband Peter spent about 40 minutes inside the Hunts Point apartment where their two girls died Wednesday in a cloud of boiling hot steam.

The couple didn’t comment, but Peter Ambrose paused briefly to look at a makeshift memorial honoring his daughters Ibanez Ambrose, 2, and Scylee Vayoh Ambrose, 1.

Danielle McGuire Ambrose and her husband Peter spent about 40 minutes inside the Hunts Point apartment where their two girls died.

The parents, in a heartbreaking gesture, gave neighbor Annie Martinez all of the little girls’ clothes to distribute among the other families in the building.

"Right now, I can’t speak,” said Martinez, after helping the couple pack up their apartment. “I don’t have no words.”

The girls were napping when a valve apparently popped off the heating unit filling the room with steam in what Mayor de Blasio called a “freak accident.”

Photographs taken inside the apartment show the girls’ cribs, one slightly larger than the other, sitting side-by-side just behind a hole in the floor where the faulty radiator was apparently located.

A little red bike and other childrens’ toys littered the floor, and kids’ artwork was still hanging from the yellow walls.

Peter (l.) and Danielle Ambrose (2nd from l.) leave their apartment in the Bronx on Friday, December 9, 2016.

The girls were napping when a valve apparently popped off the heating unit filling the room with steam in what Mayor de Blasio called a “freak accident.”

The Ambroses’ sad visit came a day after officials and the girls’ relatives blasted the city for placing the homeless family in a building owned by a notorious slumlord.

Outside the apartment at 720 Hunts Point Avenue.

The Hunts Point Ave. building is used by the city to house homeless families as part of its cluster-site program, which provides temporary shelter in privately owned complexes.

The Bushwick Economic Development Corp., a non-profit hired by the city, moved the family into the building in late 2015 when its landlord was listed on the Public Advocate Letitia James’ list of the “100 worst” in the city.

Front page of the New York Daily News for December 8, 2016.

The Bronx District Attorney’s Office is investigating Piller and his building at 720 Hunts Point Ave.

A woman who lived in the unit before the Ambrose family moved in told the Daily News Thursday the same radiator malfunctioned in the same way a year earlier.

The previous tenant, Charlene Jackson, said she reported the break down to her case worker at the Bushwick non-profit but no one came to fix it.